Tag Archives: TED

Making investment practices more sustainable – Another great TED talk

I have thought a lot about the vocabulary we use when we speak about issues.  Much of the language we use comes to us courtesy of Economists.  We speak of consumers or clients rather than citizens.  We speak of economic debt and deficit to the exclusion of the discussion of social, cultural, environmental or infrastructure debt and deficits.  We speak of healthy economies rather than healthy people, or healthy environments.  And we rarely ever focus on important issues like fun or happiness.

This vocabulary poses a number of real problems for us. One very real problem is that if we use economic terms to describe our problems, the solutions we find will be limited to those that offer economic value.  This is the old problem where having only a hammer in your tool belt tends to make every problem look like a nail.  In the long-term, if we are to really deal with important issues in a constructive way, we have to change the way we speak to reflect our real values.  This type of culture change takes time, and, if science is to be believed, we don’t have a lot of time before the chaos starts.

In the meantime, we can at least frame our economic arguments in terms that demonstrate that sustainability is at the heart of long-term economic success, and that is done brilliantly in a TED talk (embedded below) by Chris McKnett from 2013.

TED talk on affects of wealth on personality

TED talk on effects of wealth on personality

This excellent TED talk describes how wealth can change the way we look at the world.  The first few minutes are devoted to the type of tests that the researchers used to tease out the differences in perception between rich and poor but the real meat was in the last half of the talk where the real world implications of the differences are explored.

It reinforces the need for positive reinforcement of good behaviors (behaviors that decrease inequality) and ends on a note of optimism.  The only problem is, will the people who need to listen to the talk take the time to do so.

 

A better way to recycle plastics? Mike Biddle replies to questions and comments about his 2011 TEDTalk

Plastic recycle logo Other
Plastic recycle logo Other (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a follow-on article to Mike Biddle’s excellent video on new ways of dealing with plastics recycling. In this article (originally published on the TED.COM website, Mike responds to a number of questions that arose from his original TED talk. He deals with the thorny issue of getting the waste to one of the “mining” facilities.

Here is my a link to my post on the original TED Video

TED Blog

Last October, we posted this TEDTalk given at TEDGlobal 2011 by plastic engineer Mike Biddle, Founder and President of MBA Polymers, which has developed an incredibly energy and economically efficient method to recycle plastics — by turning it into the raw material  again.

The TEDtalk elicited over 1000 comments and questions on TED.com, Youtube, Facebook, Twitter and elsewhere, including direct emails to Biddle and to the TED staff. Faced with the impossibility to answer them individually, Mike has grouped them together and addressed them below.

And now over to Biddle…

 I want to thank the TED community for all of the heartfelt comments and great questions. Although many of the comments were directed to me as I am the one that gave the TEDtalk, I’m replying here on behalf of the whole MBA Polymers team.  Much like the saying “it takes a village to raise a child”, it…

View original post 2,598 more words

The real price of market values: Michael Sandel at TEDGlobal 2013

My Comments:

This is another great TED talk about a subject of real importance…how market forces change our society and the cost of those changes. The comment about hollowing-out of discourse is most apt. Everything these days seems to be about the sound-bite, about quick fixes for complex social problems. We seem incapable of communicating a long-term vision. Great talk. Thanks TED!

 

TED Blog

Political philosopher Michael Sandel — the second “Michael from Harvard” this session — returns to TED in the last session of TEDGlobal, “All Together Now,” to address the marketization of our culture.

These days there’s very little money can’t buy. If you ever wind up in jail in San Diego, CA, and you find your cell uncomfortable, don’t fret; simply pay $82 and you’ll be upgraded. Or if you find yourself in Washington, DC, en route to a Congressional hearing, but you hear that the line is around the block, don’t give up; you can pay someone through a line-standing company to wait in line for you. You just have to show up at the last minute and take your seat.

[ted_talkteaser id=878]

In the past three decades, says Sandel, we’ve undergone a quiet revolution, drifting without realizing from a market economy to a market society, where almost everything is…

View original post 706 more words

Uncovering corruption: Charmian Gooch at TEDGlobal 2013

My Comments:

Once again, TED has published a very timely piece on an issue that is becoming huge in the west these days…corruption and its societal costs.  Corruption has always been around, but until recently in the west, it was associated with shame and scandal.  Now it seems to be so commonplace that we barely even acknowledge it.  But the costs of corruption to society are very important and this TEDGlobal talk puts the matter into perspective.  definitely worth a read.  Thanks TED.

 

TED Blog

When we talk about corruption, certain types of individuals come to mind, says Charmian Gooch, co-founder of watchdog NGO Global Witness. She gives some familiar examples of the type. There’s the (former) Soviet megalomaniac — such as Saparmurat Niyazov, the all-powerful leader of Turkmenistan, whose indulgences included erecting a 40-foot-high gold-plated statue of himself that rotated to follow the sun. There’s the African minister, dictator or official, such as Teodorin Obiang, son of the president of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea, where many live in dire poverty despite per capita income comparable to Portugal. Obiang junior owns an 18 million Euro art collection, million-dollar sports cars, a Gulfstream jet, and a $30 million Malibu mansion. Until recently, he was officially earning less than $7,000 a month. Then there’s the former Nigerian oil minister Dan Etete — a convicted money launderer.

It’s easy to think of corruption as something that happens “over there,”…

View original post 1,113 more words