Tag Archives: sustainability

Making investment practices more sustainable – Another great TED talk

I have thought a lot about the vocabulary we use when we speak about issues.  Much of the language we use comes to us courtesy of Economists.  We speak of consumers or clients rather than citizens.  We speak of economic debt and deficit to the exclusion of the discussion of social, cultural, environmental or infrastructure debt and deficits.  We speak of healthy economies rather than healthy people, or healthy environments.  And we rarely ever focus on important issues like fun or happiness.

This vocabulary poses a number of real problems for us. One very real problem is that if we use economic terms to describe our problems, the solutions we find will be limited to those that offer economic value.  This is the old problem where having only a hammer in your tool belt tends to make every problem look like a nail.  In the long-term, if we are to really deal with important issues in a constructive way, we have to change the way we speak to reflect our real values.  This type of culture change takes time, and, if science is to be believed, we don’t have a lot of time before the chaos starts.

In the meantime, we can at least frame our economic arguments in terms that demonstrate that sustainability is at the heart of long-term economic success, and that is done brilliantly in a TED talk (embedded below) by Chris McKnett from 2013.

Being green can sometimes be as simple as following the frog

The Rainforest Alliance Certified seal
The Rainforest Alliance Certified seal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It may be an advertising pitch, but there is some truth to it.  The Rainforest Alliance has put together a cute pitch that TED.COM has nominated as one of the 10 best ads of the year.  The ad shows you what you don’t want to do to be green, and then goes on to show you one thing that you can do to make a difference.  The advertisement is to “Follow the frog” which refers to purchasing goods that bear the Rainforest Alliance’s frog logo which indicates that the product was made in a way that meets the certification standards set out by the group.

Rainforest Alliance is a non-profit with the mission to “… works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices and consumer behavior.”

Now, you may note that this approach runs counter to the approach promoted by the “Story of change” people but I think the green movement is probably large enough to embrace more than one strategy for saving this beautiful world.

Why not visit their site or just watch the ad here:

The Story of Change : a new video from the makers of the “Story of Stuff”

This video is all about empowerment. It is all about acting on our commitments…to the environment, to social justice, to each other. It is about supporting our government’s initiatives for becoming a “World Class Regulator“.

As with other “stuff” video, this one makes its point in the same clear logical fashion, taking us from being environmentally conscious but isolated islands to empowered actors in a movement to make a better world for us all. It does it using the same cheeky style, replete with stick figure art and snappy dialog.

This “Free Range Studios” production joins the rest of the Story of Stuff projects as another great teaching aid. It reminds us to get together, to get involved and to become activists in our own lives.

Uncovering corruption: Charmian Gooch at TEDGlobal 2013

My Comments:

Once again, TED has published a very timely piece on an issue that is becoming huge in the west these days…corruption and its societal costs.  Corruption has always been around, but until recently in the west, it was associated with shame and scandal.  Now it seems to be so commonplace that we barely even acknowledge it.  But the costs of corruption to society are very important and this TEDGlobal talk puts the matter into perspective.  definitely worth a read.  Thanks TED.

 

TED Blog

When we talk about corruption, certain types of individuals come to mind, says Charmian Gooch, co-founder of watchdog NGO Global Witness. She gives some familiar examples of the type. There’s the (former) Soviet megalomaniac — such as Saparmurat Niyazov, the all-powerful leader of Turkmenistan, whose indulgences included erecting a 40-foot-high gold-plated statue of himself that rotated to follow the sun. There’s the African minister, dictator or official, such as Teodorin Obiang, son of the president of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea, where many live in dire poverty despite per capita income comparable to Portugal. Obiang junior owns an 18 million Euro art collection, million-dollar sports cars, a Gulfstream jet, and a $30 million Malibu mansion. Until recently, he was officially earning less than $7,000 a month. Then there’s the former Nigerian oil minister Dan Etete — a convicted money launderer.

It’s easy to think of corruption as something that happens “over there,”…

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