Tag Archives: Pollution

Some links to interesting environmental sites

One of my colleagues at work sent me this list of ten interesting environmentally-related web-pages. He recommended them to me and suggested I take a look at them. You may wish to take a look at them too. Thanks Phil!

http://www.marine-conservation.org/

 

Marine Conservation Institute is a leader in the global movement to protect and recover the integrity of vast ocean areas.

We use the latest science to identify important marine ecosystems around the world, and then advocate for their protection, for us and future generations.

http://worldwildlife.org/

centre
centre (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For 50 years, WWF has been protecting the future of nature.

The world’s leading conservation organization, WWF works in 100 countries and is supported by 1.2 million members in the United States and close to 5 million globally. WWF’s unique way of working combines global reach with a foundation in science, involves action at every level from local to global, and ensures the delivery of innovative solutions that meet the needs of both people and nature Continue reading Some links to interesting environmental sites

A better way to recycle plastics? Mike Biddle replies to questions and comments about his 2011 TEDTalk

Plastic recycle logo Other
Plastic recycle logo Other (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a follow-on article to Mike Biddle’s excellent video on new ways of dealing with plastics recycling. In this article (originally published on the TED.COM website, Mike responds to a number of questions that arose from his original TED talk. He deals with the thorny issue of getting the waste to one of the “mining” facilities.

Here is my a link to my post on the original TED Video

TED Blog

Last October, we posted this TEDTalk given at TEDGlobal 2011 by plastic engineer Mike Biddle, Founder and President of MBA Polymers, which has developed an incredibly energy and economically efficient method to recycle plastics — by turning it into the raw material  again.

The TEDtalk elicited over 1000 comments and questions on TED.com, Youtube, Facebook, Twitter and elsewhere, including direct emails to Biddle and to the TED staff. Faced with the impossibility to answer them individually, Mike has grouped them together and addressed them below.

And now over to Biddle…

 I want to thank the TED community for all of the heartfelt comments and great questions. Although many of the comments were directed to me as I am the one that gave the TEDtalk, I’m replying here on behalf of the whole MBA Polymers team.  Much like the saying “it takes a village to raise a child”, it…

View original post 2,598 more words

Reducing herbicide use – Amazon hires goats for Japanese office landscaping – Your Community

Local goat takes a bite out of weed control problem for Amazon

Here is an unusual article from CBC about how Amazon.com is making use of Japanese goats to get rid of problem weeds on the company’s Japanese office grounds.  Companies don’t always get it right, but when they do, they should get kudos from the rest of us.

Amazon hires goats for Japanese office landscaping – Your Community.

Good on you Amazon.

Oh, and by the way, goats and sheep aren’t allergic to poison ivy, so they are a great way to get rid of that particularly pesky weed.  See this interesting page describing how goats can be very eco-friendly.  I am not certain how eco-friendly goats are in times of drought though…I had heard that the very things that make goats eco-friendly from a herbicide perspective can make them less sustainable in times of drought because they tend to denude the landscape, even eating the roots of the plants.

Scientific American Article about the Dangers Associated With CF Light Bulbs

Scientific American Article about the Dangers Associated With CF Light Bulbs

As a follow-on to my earlier article about various technologies for lighting your home, I wanted to post this link.  As the date for conversion of all light bulbs from incandescent looms near there is a lot more is being said about the safety of CF bulbs.  Scientific American, known as a source of reliable information that is accessible to the common citizen, has written an article that describes the dangers associated with disposal of broken fluorescent bulbs. 

Pool leaks are an environmental disaster!

swimming pool
swimming pool (Photo credit: freefotouk)

Regardless of what anyone tells you, if you live in North America your pool should not be losing more than about an eighth of an inch of water (3 mm) each day in the summer.  If it is losing more that that…don’t ignore it and don’t let people tell you that the larger amount of water loss is to be expected.  An inch of pool water is a huge amount and the western world is just beginning to understand that water is our most precious resource.  Don’t waste it like I did!

My family has had an in-ground swimming pool since the kids were little. Generally, we have only had to fill up the pool in the early spring and we are more-or-less good for the rest of the season.  There is a bit of evaporation, but it is usually replaced by rainfall.  This year, unfortunately, was “off the charts” as far as water consumption goes and that is an environmental disaster. Continue reading Pool leaks are an environmental disaster!

Do you remember when Hudson Quebec changed the world of lawn care?

Supreme Court of Canada building, Ottawa, Onta...
Supreme Court of Canada building, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of my colleagues passed me a link to the trailer for a really interesting movie entitled “A Chemical Reaction”. The documentary was produced by Paul Tukey, an award winning writer about lawn care. He is the founder of the safelawns.org, which is an organization that has as its mission to “To create a broad-based coalition of non- and for-profit organizations committed to educating society about the benefits of environmentally responsible lawn care and gardening, and effect a quantum change in consumer and industry behavior.”

The trailer is for a documentary that features our little neighbour, the town of Hudson Quebec (just East of Ottawa), and how a local doctor there, aided by the mayor and council changed the way that lawns are maintained in Canada and likely around the world.

I can remember when it all all went down, but it was a blast to see the folks that made it happen. I remember that there was concern in the medical community (especially in the holistic medical community) about the safety of lawn care products, and that concern was slowly spreading to the general community. You might remember that, back then, everyone (especially municipalities) dumped tons of chemicals on their lawns each year to make them green and “healthy”. Of course the fact that the resulting monoculture was anything but “healthy” and brought with it serious health effects for many creatures (including people) was only beginning to dawn on most of us. And then, in response to a conserted campaign by a local doctor, the Mayor and council of Hudson Quebec decided to take a stand for the health of people over the “health” of lawns. After 10 years of legal battles that ended up in the Supreme Court of Canada, brave little Hudson prevailed and the Court affirmed the right of municipalities to have by-laws that ban the use of chemicals for lawn care.

Anyway, I have only seen the trailer for this documentary, but I found it to be very engaging and compelling. The full film is available on DVD for private or public viewing. The full film is $19.95 to purchase for private viewing and is available for screening at a higher cost. I am considering buying a personal copy so that I can write a better review in the future, but at 3 minutes and 44 seconds, you will not be wasting your time if you decide to look at the trailer.

What’s with the wind every recycling day!

English: Blue household recycling bins/crates ...
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Have you every noticed, that it is almost always windy on the nights when you have to put out your paper or your plastic for recycling?

My house is at the end of a long street that parallels the direction of the prevailing winds and you should see my front yard on recycling mornings. What a mess.  This week, for example, was a plastic recycling week, and after the recycling was picked up by the city I collected two full bins of plastics and cans.

Now, I hate to complain about people who are doing their civic duty by recycling, because I really believe in recycling programs, but seriously! can’t you secure your recycling a bit better than that? When you put your plastics out on a blustery day and the box is overflowing with lightweight plastics, do you really think that they will ever make it into the truck?

At my house, our plastics go into a large rolling blue box with an attached cover so they never blow anywhere. Now this works for plastics because they are so lightweight, but it won’t work for paper because the folks that pick it up would herniate themselves if you packed paper in a large bin. So what can you do about paper products. I suggest that you either pack one of the boxes you are throwing out with paper and put it on top of the filled black box. This way, the paper in the box is protected from the wind and the box itself weighs down the paper in the black box. Another alternative is to put a large rock or a piece of firewood on top of the paper in the black box. The garbage-men will dump these weights back onto your driveway before they dump the contents of the box into the truck, so you can use them over and over again. If you secure your recycling, more of it will actually get to the recycling depot and you will be maximizing your reduction in waste footprint.

But best of all, if you secure your lightweight recyclables, they won’t end up in my front yard. And as Martha Stewart would say, “that is a good thing”.

Metroland.com – Trash Troubles

Polski: Wysypisko odpadów w Łubnej
Image via Wikipedia

The other day at work, one of my colleagues passed a link on to me because she knew that I am interested in waste management.  I really have to thank her because the link she provided was to an excellent 3 part article entitled “Trash Troubles – grappling with our garbage” (Metroland.com – Trash Troubles) published in MetroLand.com and authored by Don Campbell and Thana Dharmarajah.  These two journalists have done a really good job describing the problems with our solid waste management in many communities in Southern and Eastern Ontario.  It is really worth a read.

In the article, they describe the escalating cost of landfill, the ridiculous practice of shipping our garbage out of our jurisdictions, the patchwork of recycling programs across the province and they provide a few ideas about what citizens can do to minimize their impact on the environment.  They discuss where the responsibility lies for cleaning up our act.

The most important thing that I took away from their article was a feeling that the province needs to step up to the plate and play a bigger role, establishing policies and standards for managing solid waste across all communities, identifying best practices, building markets for recycled materials, and helping to fund waste management programs in a way that provides the best bang for the buck.

Electronic waste accumulates at an alarming rate

Another thing that they bring up that I have been advocating for years is for extended producer responsibility for waste management.  I blogged about this earlier in my open letter to the plastics industry. It is high time that we start holding producers partly responsible for managing the waste that flows from our consumption of their products.  Yes, this will increase the costs of products, but we are paying anyway…this will only bring the payment front and centre and not hiding it in the line items of municipal taxes.  If you want to read more about plastic recycling read my blog entry at https://gourken.wordpress.com/2011/10/08/an-open-letter-to-the-plastics-industry/

Anyway, the article by Campbell and Dharmarajah is an excellent overview of the issues that we need to face if we are to manage our solid wastes responsibly.  While the picture they paint isn’t too hopeful, they do present a few things that will help us see that the future isn’t too bleak either. 

On a final note, I am still very intrigued with Mike Biddle’s idea of using of mining technologies to mine waste streams to allow the extraction and reuse of plastic polymers and metals.  If it works, this is a paradigm shift worthy of the word.  It seems to me that you could use this technology to go back into landfills and mine for valuable resources (like the plastic polymers and the metal ores buried there).  If you want to read more about this technology (and see a video of how it works), visit Mr. Biddle’s web site at http://www.mbapolymers.com/home/.

Solar Lights Recycling | Your Solar Link

I am constantly looking for good environmental blogs and have been following a really good one lately named “Environmental world for all”.  The site is authored by a university student in peace studies with minor in environmental studies. One of the author’s recent posts discusses the benefits of solar LEDs for use as Christmas lights.  It is a really well thougth out article and in it the author discusses the pros and cons around this issue. 

When I left a comment and asked him about the ability to recycle these devices he brought my attention to this site (Solar Lights Recycling | Your Solar Link)  in the US that is trying to set up a recycling program for these products. 

If you are interested in environmental issues I think a few minutes browsing these two sites would be time well spent.

 

Not everything environmental is about new technology…sometimes it is doing what we do in a smarter way.

Sometimes being environmentally friendly means using new technologies like solar and wind power, but sometimes it is simply about doing what we have always done, but doing it in a smarter way. 

URISA, an association of GIS professionals, has an annual competition for students in the GIS field to produce papers and posters on using GIS to solve real world problems.  One group in Maine has used GIS technology to model how to reduce the cost of transportation of recyclables from collection locations to the processing plants.  They will still be using the same technology to collect the recyclables, but they will be reducing the distance that they are transported, resulting in an enormous savings in CO2 generation and a reasonable savings in cost.  This will be especially valuable if we ever move to a “mining” paradigm for dealing with recyclable waste.

To read more about how they propose to do this I recommend that you read Minimizing Transportation Costs with Location-Allocation Analysis: An Application to Recycling « GIS and Science

This is yet another example where students have come up with innovative solutions to problems that we have lived with for ages.  Maybe there is hope for us yet!

An open letter to the plastics industry

Self made from PNG.
Image via Wikipedia

First, I am not rabidly anti-plastic. I think that plastic has made many parts of our life better, but I am against plastic waste (plastic for which there is no after market recycling program) and I am against over packaging, and your industry is implicated in both.

From an energy perspective, I am aware that lightweight plastic packaging is cheaper to transport than many other materials. From an energy perspective, the problem is that plastics consume oil products that could be used to heat homes, to fuel automobiles, etc. If you cannot reuse a plastic product that is recycled, it means that you will be consuming new oil for every product you produce.

From a waste perspective, you need look no further than the Eastern Pacific to see a Texas sized “island” of plastic waste that will last for tens of thousands of years. If your industry does not come to grips with this problem, we will be doing it for you by banning the use of plastic products. This is not in your best interests and it isn’t good for consumers either. Get your act together and:

1. Make certain that every type of plastic is well-marked for recycling and don’t allow unmarked plastics into the market place.

2. Help local governments fund plastic recycling programs

3. Help create markets for recycled plastic and ways to use them that is environmentally friendly and energy-efficient

4. Don’t produce anything that you cannot re-use in manufacturing and set targets and deadlines for recycling 80% of the product you produce.

5. Ensure that products that contain recycled plastic are marked, advertising that they have helped keep plastic out of landfills.

6. Talk to the packaging industry and retail stores to get them to reduce “over packaging” and to ensure that all packaging can be easily separated into non-plastic and plastic products and that the individual plastic components are all marked for recycling

7. Fund “bring it back collection sites” for large plastic components that it is not possible for the recycling programs to handle.

Many of the same recommendations should be addressed to municipal and provincial governments to ensure that if industry doesn’t step up to the plate that the regulators do, so if you don’t want to get regulated out of business, I suggest you consider cleaning up your act.

Gourken

 

Solar light bulbs for pennies (Isang Litrong Liwanag/a litre of light)

A litre of light

I just ran across a wonderful innovationthat seems to have been around for a few years but just now seems to be garnering widespread attention. The innovation seems to be the brainchild either the Massachusetts Institute of Technology or of Mr. Illac Diaz of the Philippines. It is as brilliant in its simplicity as it is as a light bulb. I am going to leave the description of the “bulbs” and how they are used to the foundation (and to two interesting YouTube videos (describing the why and how). One of the linked videos below describes this as an idea out of MIT and that makes sense because that institution seems to focus on a lot of simple projects to help the poor (see my earlier blog about solar powered water desalinators that were developed by MIT folks).

Continue reading Solar light bulbs for pennies (Isang Litrong Liwanag/a litre of light)

Ottawa is back to recycling all hard plastics

The newspaper reports that the City of Ottawa is, once again, recycling all hard plastics. You may remember that some time in the Chiarelli administration Ottawa decided to save some money by taking a money losing, but successful, program of plastic recycling and scrap (literally) everything except recycling of number 1 and 2 plastics. There’s no telling how much the changes saved the city, but it is clear that we didn’t divert nearly as much waste from landfill than we would otherwise have. Now the real costs come home to roost with the Trail Road landfill facility fast filling up and Waste Management Inc. asking for permission to increase the size of their Carp Road facility. This is the real legacy of that tax savings…the need to take otherwise valuable land and re-purpose it as a landfill. Some savings!!!

When are we going to start taking a longer term view of our actions? When are we going to put as much emphasis on environmental, social and community debts as we put on economic debts?

Anyway, it seems like the current council has it’s head on a bit straighter than the past few. Let’s hope that they keep it up!

Forever Plastic: Basic Tip for Recycling Plastic – Doc Zone | CBC-TV

CBC Television
Image via Wikipedia

Given the interest in solid waste policy in the City of Ottawa at the moment, now might be a great time for you to brush up on some recycling facts.  CBC has a page and a video with some interesting information that might inform and entertain you.

Forever Plastic: Basic Tip for Recycling Plastic – Doc Zone | CBC-TV

City of Ottawa – Residential Solid Waste Service Level Review

image used in the co-processing wiki
Image via Wikipedia

The City of Ottawa is currently conducting a review of residental solid waste service levels and this is your chance to have a say before the service levels change (or your tax bill does).  The solid waste review has its own web page on the city’s site. 

City of Ottawa – Residential Solid Waste Service Level Review.

The site includes an on-line survey which allows you to give the city your views directly … democracy in action and all that.  I took the survey and it took about 5 minutes to answer.  They also have a contact address if the survey doesn’t give you enough flexibility to present your views.

The Story of Stuff Project – or why did I need this do-dad again?

Logo of the International Bottled Water Associ...
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Want an interesting way to explain to kids how consumer demand is created?  Want to get some interesting facts about bottled water? What to know what cap-and-trade really means and whether it is a good thing or not?  Want to know what all our electronic toys cost the planet? Why not mosey over to the “Story of Stuff Project” for some short, entertaining clips that are ideal for explaining difficult topics in simple English.  It’s suitable for kids and adults and, while it doesn’t always provide the answers to life’s woes, it helps you start asking the right questions.  Two thumbs up!

How do you decide which green technology to use to light your home.

Image showing both a fluorescent and an incand...
Image via Wikipedia

One thing that has always bothered me about being an environmentalist is that there is never enough good information available to the consumer allowing them to make intelligent decisions.  Case in point … what kind of lightbulbs to use in the house to reduce the total carbon footprint and to be generally green.

For years now, we have been asked to consider moving to compact fluorescent lightbulbs because they last longer and they are far more efficient than the incandescent bulbs we have used for the last hundred years or so.  Continue reading How do you decide which green technology to use to light your home.