Tag Archives: Carbon footprint

Making investment practices more sustainable – Another great TED talk

I have thought a lot about the vocabulary we use when we speak about issues.  Much of the language we use comes to us courtesy of Economists.  We speak of consumers or clients rather than citizens.  We speak of economic debt and deficit to the exclusion of the discussion of social, cultural, environmental or infrastructure debt and deficits.  We speak of healthy economies rather than healthy people, or healthy environments.  And we rarely ever focus on important issues like fun or happiness.

This vocabulary poses a number of real problems for us. One very real problem is that if we use economic terms to describe our problems, the solutions we find will be limited to those that offer economic value.  This is the old problem where having only a hammer in your tool belt tends to make every problem look like a nail.  In the long-term, if we are to really deal with important issues in a constructive way, we have to change the way we speak to reflect our real values.  This type of culture change takes time, and, if science is to be believed, we don’t have a lot of time before the chaos starts.

In the meantime, we can at least frame our economic arguments in terms that demonstrate that sustainability is at the heart of long-term economic success, and that is done brilliantly in a TED talk (embedded below) by Chris McKnett from 2013.

Exercise – not only does it save energy, but it saves you too!

You may think it a bit of a stretch to link exercise to the environment, but I think it is pretty appropriate.  What got me thinking about it was an article on CBC.ca that pointed to the following YouTube video.  I hope that after watching the video you agree with me.

The video is by Toronto’s Dr. Mike Evans and as CBC’s article pointed out, it has gone viral on YouTube (it has now had over 1.6M hits).  Both the video and the article about it on CBC.ca refer to the health benefits of exercise for all of what ails you (hence the name “magic pill”).  The video is reminiscent of the videos on the “Story of Stuff” channel on YouTube.  While doctor Evans makes his very compelling argument in favour of exercising at least 30 minutes a day (and he notes that more is better to a limit) he draws images on a whiteboard that capture your attention and make you want to listen to the message.  I am not certain if he is any way associated with the Story of Stuff people, but the style of drawing and the humourous and interesting facts he injects into the discussion sure remind me of their excellent environmental pieces.

What interested me most was the fact that even the most moderate exercise (only 11 minutes per day) provided a huge benefit to many of the body’s critical systems.  The first 30 minutes of exercise seems to get you the biggest bang for your sweat buck.  After 30 minutes the benefits accrue in decreasing amounts, but they still accrue. 

Want to find out what sorts of problems you can alleviate with the magic pill of exercise?  Take 6 minutes and watch the video.  You won’t regret the investment in time… I sure didn’t.  You will instantly see why it went viral.  Send a link to the video on to your loved ones. 

Oh, what was the tie in to the environment you ask?  Well, if you are walking, running or cycling everywhere, you aren’t burning fossil fuels, and I think we can all agree that lowering your carbon footprint benefits the environment.

As a final postscript, remember to keep checking back to the “Story of Stuff” channel to see if they have added anything new.  Their environmental stuff is fantastic and it is great for all ages.

And thanks again to CBC.ca for providing me with another excellent learning experience.

Solar light bulbs for pennies (Isang Litrong Liwanag/a litre of light)

A litre of light

I just ran across a wonderful innovationthat seems to have been around for a few years but just now seems to be garnering widespread attention. The innovation seems to be the brainchild either the Massachusetts Institute of Technology or of Mr. Illac Diaz of the Philippines. It is as brilliant in its simplicity as it is as a light bulb. I am going to leave the description of the “bulbs” and how they are used to the foundation (and to two interesting YouTube videos (describing the why and how). One of the linked videos below describes this as an idea out of MIT and that makes sense because that institution seems to focus on a lot of simple projects to help the poor (see my earlier blog about solar powered water desalinators that were developed by MIT folks).

Continue reading Solar light bulbs for pennies (Isang Litrong Liwanag/a litre of light)