Category Archives: Democratic Institutions

Public Service Sick Leave

Unfortunately, this government and many previous governments have spent years successfully vilifying the public service so I am afraid that a large minority of public opinion will side with Clement on this.  He has successfully driven a wedge between public servants that I know to be motivated by public interest and some members of the public that they serve.

It’s funny that when the politicians abuse their travel expenses, controls get put on public service travel. Politicians get involved in partisan advertising, and public servants get subjected to advertising controls.  Politicians make poor decisions about policy and the public service gets a black eye for not being able to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.

I am sick of small-minded little men like Clement taking out their anger on the public service.  I have worked with some extremely dedicated public servants that display no “feeling of entitlement”. They go into the office every day and work hard trying to  support their government and provide the best service to the public in a toxic environment with shrinking budgets. These people stay out of the political fray and try their hardest to provide good advice on public policy, which is often ignored because it does not align with the dogma of the party that is in power.

I know that many Canadians have no access to paid sick leave, and that makes me very sad, but rather than trying to drag down those who do, why not fight for the same access to health leave for everyone. The money is there in the economy (you just have to look at the profit figures for big business and the compensation packages for executives), it is just not being shared. The economy exists to support the aspirations of society, not the other way around.  When the economy fails to provide citizens with stable, reasonably compensated jobs that give them the hope of be able to contribute meaningfully to society, it has stopped doing its job and it is time for a change.

Let’s not let people sow fear and discord for political benefit.  Let us, rather, look for a future when we pull together to maintain this wonderful country that we have built-up with sweat, toil and good planning.

The same old energy mix — The Japan Times editorial

The same old energy mix — The Japan Times editorial.

I follow the folks that write Japan Safety: Nuclear Energy Updates and they just posted an article from the Japan Times where they look at the current government’s plans for energy sustainability over the next few decades. The picture is disturbing in light of the disaster at Fukushima in 2011.

Nuclear energy is carbon neutral, but it brings so many other long-term risks into the picture that it should not be considered as a sustainable energy source.  At Fukushima, they are having to store huge amounts of contaminated water on a site that was completely inundated with ocean water in 2011.

Read the article here.

Sweden have successfully used taxes to reduce environmental damage.

Interesting piece, and it now has a great link to the OECD report that the statistics come from.

Sweden has shown a longstanding commitment to the environment, significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution and nitrogen leaching.

Renewables supply more than a third of its energy needs. Sweden has set itself tough targets for the future, however, and must continue to innovate if it is to meet them, according to a new OECD report.

Sweden is one of the few countries to have successfully used taxes to reduce environmental damage. Strong environmental record, that has encouraged eco-innovation and spurred the use of green technologies.

“Sweden is a frontrunner in using market instruments like green taxes to discourage environmentally harmful activities and foster new technologies,” said OECD Environment Director Simon Upton, presenting the Review’s main findings in Stockholm.

View original post

Please pass a strengthened Reform Act (and similar changes in every province)

Here is a message I received from Elizabeth May, OC, MP and leader of the Green Party of Canada. It lays out clearly a major problem with Canada’s democratic institutions.


From: Elizabeth.May@parl.gc.ca [mailto:Elizabeth.May@parl.gc.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2014 8:14 AM
To: [protected]
Subject: RE: Please pass a strengthened Reform Act (and similar changes in every province)
Thank you for writing about Conservative Member of Parliament Michael Chong’s Private Member’s Bill C-586, dubbed the Reform Act. I fully support his bill. In fact, the proposal to remove the requirement for the party leader to sign nomination papers, as originally written, was the key issue addressed in my Private Members Bill C-503, the Democratic Local Nomination Act, tabled in May:

http://elizabethmaymp.ca/legislation/c-503

With all the talk these days about the Senate and the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO), it is easy to forget that we actually live in a democracy. In Westminster Parliamentary Democracy, it is Parliament—as representatives of the citizens of the country—that is sovereign. Not the Prime Minister, not the PMO, not the Party, not anyone else.

It has been a consistent trend in recent Canadian governments, across party lines, to shift the balance of power away from Parliament to the PMO. What this has left us with is an elected dictatorship, a Parliament not accountable to the people, and a feeling of radical impotence by Canadian citizens who no longer see Parliament as an effective defender of their rights and needs.

In this political climate, Michael Chong’s Reform Act comes as a breath of fresh air. This bill seeks to restore power to the grassroots, to the Canadian people, in granting local people the right to choose who will represent them in Parliament. While we also desperately need electoral reform, to remove First Past the Post, this bill addresses a crucial parliamentary reform — ending the tyranny of leaders.

Democratic reform is a non-partisan issue. None of these changes affect any party more than the other. It is true that these changes will change the way the party functions but this will be a positive change if it means returning power to the hands of the people. And, as Mr. Chong has been reminding us, this bill is not about adding anything new to our democratic system, but about returning to old practices that were not formally enshrined in law.

It will take support from across all parties to pass this bill. While it has passed Second Reading, Members of Parliament need to know that people will be watching to see how they cast their final vote. Please keep up the pressure on the NDP and the Liberals so that they will support this bill. With all opposition parties on board, we will have the maximum pressure on Conservative back-bench MPs to vote for the bill.

A list of Members of Parliament can be found here:

http://www.parl.gc.ca/MembersOfParliament/MainMPsCompleteList.aspx?TimePeriod=Current&Language=E

As I said on CBC “Power and Politics” recently, “Canadian democracy is on life support and Michael Chong’s bill is CPR!”

Thank you again for writing.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth May, O.C., M.P.

Member of Parliament for Saanich–Gulf Islands

Leader of the Green Party of Canada