ALIEN STAR SYSTEM BUZZED THE SUN

gourken:

What a difference 0.8 Light-years makes. Imagine if the pair had been captured into an orbit by our sun and how that would have affected planetary and trajectories. Blows my mind. Thanks

Originally posted on jizidi:

solar

An alien star passed through our Solar System just 70,000 years ago, astronomers have discovered.

No other star is known to have approached this close to us.

An international team of researchers says it came five times closer than our current nearest neighbour – Proxima Centauri.

The object, a red dwarf known as Scholz’s star, cruised through the outer reaches of the Solar System – a region known as the Oort Cloud.

Scholz’s star was not alone; it was accompanied on its travels by an object known as a brown dwarf. These are essentially failed stars that lacked the necessary mass to get fusion going in their cores.

The findings are published in Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Observations of the dim star’s trajectory suggest that 70,000 years ago this cosmic infiltrator passed within 0.8 light years of the Sun. By comparison, Proxima Centauri is 4.2 light years away.

Close encounter

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New green energy course inspires high school seniors from across the country

I always look at MIT’s stuff whenever the world gets me down and I feel like giving up.  There is so much innovation and enthusiasm there that my hope gets restored.  Thanks MIT!

New green energy course inspires high school seniors from across the country.

Can Japan recapture its solar power? — MIT Technology Review

gourken:

Imagine what we could do in Canada with the same type of leadership. I only hope it doesn’t require a core meltdown for our leaders to step up to the plate and address this issue in Canada too.

Originally posted on Japan Safety : Nuclear Energy Updates:

” It’s 38 °C on the Atsumi Peninsula southwest of Tokyo: a deadly heat wave has been gripping much of Japan late this summer. Inside the offices of a newly built power plant operated by the plastics company Mitsui Chemicals, the AC is blasting. Outside, 215,000 solar panels are converting the blistering sunlight into 50 megawatts of electricity for the local grid. Three 118-meter-high wind turbines erected at the site add six megawatts of generation capacity to back up the solar panels during the winter.

Mitsui’s plant is just one of thousands of renewable-power installations under way as Japan confronts its third summer in a row without use of the nuclear reactors that had delivered almost 30 percent of its electricity. In Japan people refer to the earthquake and nuclear disaster at Tokyo Electric Power Company’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on March 11, 2011, as “Three-Eleven.” Radioactive contamination forced…

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A molecular approach to solar power (MIT News)

gourken:

This is another example of excellent innovation from MIT and Harvard. This one is for energy storage and it is quite similar to one I just recently posted on the “bionic leaf”. With better solar energy conversion and more efficient energy storage the idea of moving away from fossil fuels and nuclear power begins to look possible.

Originally posted on Open Matters:

Diagram of molecules going through solar-induced charge-discharge cycle, with heat released. The working cycle of a solar thermal fuel, using azobenzene as an example. (Courtesy of Jeff Grossman.)

A molecular approach to solar power
Switchable material could harness the power of the sun — even when it’s not shining.

David L. Chandler | MIT News Office
April 13, 2014

It’s an obvious truism, but one that may soon be outdated: The problem with solar power is that sometimes the sun doesn’t shine.

Now a team at MIT and Harvard University has come up with an ingenious workaround — a material that can absorb the sun’s heat and store that energy in chemical form, ready to be released again on demand.

This solution is no solar-energy panacea: While it could produce electricity, it would be inefficient at doing so. But for applications where heat is the desired output — whether for heating buildings, cooking, or powering heat-based industrial processes — this could…

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10 Lessons I learned Living in a Tiny House #6-10

gourken:

Item #6 below is an interesting example of the “reduce” from the “reduce, reuse and recycle” strategy for sustainability. In essence, the author reminds us that changing our behaviour to want less “things” and to do more for ourselves is more sustainable than simply generating the our energy more efficiently and consuming the same amount we always have. It is something to always keep in mind…Do I really need this new thing?

Originally posted on 21 Days on the Road:

#6- Change it Up

You must be willing to change how you live. This is a mistake I sometimes see people make, especially those who switch to living off the grid, where their living system has changed but their expectations of life didn’t. A great example is with power (I know this is a bit redundant from #3, but since energy consumption and production are such important issues these days I figure what the heck.). I know folks who built lovely off the grid houses only to drop a small fortune on solar power and solar hot water arrays and batteries. Of course there is nothing inherently wrong with this idea, solar power is arguably a shade more environmentally friendly than other forms of power production, but it does take a lot of resources and energy to produce solar power equipment and those products don’t last forever. I’m not

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Construction is set to begin on a $150 million-plus solar powered greenhouse in South Australia’s Port Augusta

John [jpratt27] has published an excellent summary of a new plan to develop a new solar-powered greenhouse in South Australia.  This plant will not only produce fresh vegetables but will also be used to desalinate water in a very arid region.  A few more details are needed about how the resulting salts will be dealt with, but the project looks very hopeful.

February 17 Energy [Science and Tech] News via GeoHarvy

gourken:

“GeoHarvey” has posted a lot of excellence and hopeful stories here. It’s nice to hear some good news for a change.

Originally posted on geoharvey:

Science and Technology:

¶ A number of studies investigating the effect of wind turbines on birds have found that the actual impact wind turbines have on avians is relatively low. However, according to this new research, published in the European Journal of Wildlife Research, wind turbines’ effects on bats cannot be ignored. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Israeli alternative energy company Brenmiller Energy has solved one of the biggest issues with solar technology: how to generate electricity when the sun sets. The company says it will build a 10-MW solar facility that will generate electricity 20 hours per day through a proprietary energy storage technology. [Inhabitat]

World:

¶ In Geneva, Switzerland just three weeks after the US Senate’s 98-1 vote that climate change is not a hoax, the first round of the 2015 United Nations talks among 194 nations produced the first-ever universally agreed negotiating text on how…

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A ‘bionic leaf’ turns solar energy into chemicals and fuels

The site at the link below (“A ‘bionic leaf’ …”) presents a really interesting idea on how to store energy from the sun and at the same time act as a temporary carbon sink by absorbing CO2 for creation of the chemicals.  I will be looking forward to seeing how this plays out when they try to scale it up to household, community and industrial sizes.

A ‘bionic leaf’ turns solar energy into chemicals and fuels.

The Australian Academy of Science says man-made climate change is real.

gourken:

Sorry about the original posting…I posted the comment on the article from my smart phone and it “corrected” my spelling to make my comment unintelligible. Here is what I meant to say.

It is sad that, because of ill  informed or ill intentioned climate change deniers, we are just now getting around to acknowledging formally that human activities are implemented in the changes to the global climate. The need to be “balanced” means that we have spent an inordinate amount of time defending the proven and discussing the ridiculous.  It is not time to move on to finding a solution to the problems.

But, better late than never.

Originally posted on jpratt27:

The Australian Academy of Science says man-made climate change is real and the consequences will be dire if no action is taken to address it.

The academy, in an update to its science of climate change booklet produced in 2010, says its authoritative account of the science behind global warming will help counter confusion and misinformation.

The update is written and reviewed by 17 of Australia’s leading experts in a range of climate-related sciences.

Earth’s climate has changed over the past century. The atmosphere and oceans have warmed, sea levels have risen, and glaciers and ice sheets have decreased in size.

The best available evidence, the scientists say, indicates that greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are the main cause.

Chris Pash | businessinsider.com.au

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Why Tesla’s battery for your home should terrify utilities

Originally posted on On the River:

Elon Musk’s electricity empire could mean a new type of power grid

http://www.theverge.com/2015/2/13/8033691/why-teslas-battery-for-your-home-should-terrify-utilities

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Solar Panels Too Ugly? Check out Solar Shingles

gourken:

Love to see this technology get higher penetration in the market, but would also like to see some details on how effective the shingles are in northern climates where snow is an issue. Do they “shed” snow or are they basically off during the winter. Also, how well do the stand up to high winds. Thanks for a really interesting article.

Originally posted on RE Projects:

Despite their undeniable environmental and economic merits, rooftop solar panels are sometimes dismissed simply because the homeowner is afraid of ruining the appearance of their home. While I do not share the same view (I think solar panels are downright beautiful), companies like Dow Solar have recognized this and developed more aesthetically pleasing Solar Shingles.

Solar Shingles are becoming more and more efficient, with continued breakthroughs in thin-film solar panels (like Copper Indium Gallium Selenide), which have increased in efficiency since 2008 from 10% to about 20% (solar efficiency expectations are much more forgiving that school grades). Additionally, the price of solar shingles has been falling rapidly, now on par with traditionally solar panel systems with similar efficiency in many regions.

Another major difference is while solar panels typically bolt on top of an existing roof, solar shingles become a part of it. Instead of being installed in addition to the singles they simply replace them. They are designed…

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News Release: Annual Report: Privacy Commissioner emphasizes importance of online transparency – August 21, 2014

https://www.priv.gc.ca/media/nr-c/2014/nr-c_140821_e.asp

In an update to a previous post, as of last summer, the Privacy Commissioner of Canada was still working on the 168 complaints received about Bell Canada for its data collection and use policy.

Old fashioned telephone
Telephone

Stay tuned, it will be interesting to see what they finally come up with.

Max Finkelstein Wows them at Rideau Roundtable event

image

About 60 paddlers and environmentalists got together yesterday to see renowned paddler, raconteur, and author Max Finkelstein speak about his latest adventure paddling the Big Muddy (Mississippi) with the American adventurers that rowed across the Atlantic.

image

Max was at his casual best, evoking

Continue reading Max Finkelstein Wows them at Rideau Roundtable event

Local Leader: Max Finkelstein, canoeist, author, river conservationist | ottawariverkeeper.ca >

Are you an avid or wanna be paddler? Join Max, a world renowned paddler, at a Rideau Roundtable event on Sunday, January 25th at Ben Franklin Place in Nepean’s Centrepoint where he presents his experiences on the Big Muddy (the Mississippi) following paths taken by traders centuries ago.

Local Leader: Max Finkelstein, canoeist, author, river conservationist | ottawariverkeeper.ca >.

Please pass a strengthened Reform Act (and similar changes in every province)

Here is a message I received from Elizabeth May, OC, MP and leader of the Green Party of Canada. It lays out clearly a major problem with Canada’s democratic institutions.


From: Elizabeth.May@parl.gc.ca [mailto:Elizabeth.May@parl.gc.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2014 8:14 AM
To: [protected]
Subject: RE: Please pass a strengthened Reform Act (and similar changes in every province)
Thank you for writing about Conservative Member of Parliament Michael Chong’s Private Member’s Bill C-586, dubbed the Reform Act. I fully support his bill. In fact, the proposal to remove the requirement for the party leader to sign nomination papers, as originally written, was the key issue addressed in my Private Members Bill C-503, the Democratic Local Nomination Act, tabled in May:

http://elizabethmaymp.ca/legislation/c-503

With all the talk these days about the Senate and the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO), it is easy to forget that we actually live in a democracy. In Westminster Parliamentary Democracy, it is Parliament—as representatives of the citizens of the country—that is sovereign. Not the Prime Minister, not the PMO, not the Party, not anyone else.

It has been a consistent trend in recent Canadian governments, across party lines, to shift the balance of power away from Parliament to the PMO. What this has left us with is an elected dictatorship, a Parliament not accountable to the people, and a feeling of radical impotence by Canadian citizens who no longer see Parliament as an effective defender of their rights and needs.

In this political climate, Michael Chong’s Reform Act comes as a breath of fresh air. This bill seeks to restore power to the grassroots, to the Canadian people, in granting local people the right to choose who will represent them in Parliament. While we also desperately need electoral reform, to remove First Past the Post, this bill addresses a crucial parliamentary reform — ending the tyranny of leaders.

Democratic reform is a non-partisan issue. None of these changes affect any party more than the other. It is true that these changes will change the way the party functions but this will be a positive change if it means returning power to the hands of the people. And, as Mr. Chong has been reminding us, this bill is not about adding anything new to our democratic system, but about returning to old practices that were not formally enshrined in law.

It will take support from across all parties to pass this bill. While it has passed Second Reading, Members of Parliament need to know that people will be watching to see how they cast their final vote. Please keep up the pressure on the NDP and the Liberals so that they will support this bill. With all opposition parties on board, we will have the maximum pressure on Conservative back-bench MPs to vote for the bill.

A list of Members of Parliament can be found here:

http://www.parl.gc.ca/MembersOfParliament/MainMPsCompleteList.aspx?TimePeriod=Current&Language=E

As I said on CBC “Power and Politics” recently, “Canadian democracy is on life support and Michael Chong’s bill is CPR!”

Thank you again for writing.

Sincerely,

Elizabeth May, O.C., M.P.

Member of Parliament for Saanich–Gulf Islands

Leader of the Green Party of Canada

JD Power – Builder Satisfaction Survey – Methodology concerns

Here is an e-mail I sent to the “ask-us” link from the JD Power web site about their survey methodology for “New-Home Builder’s Customer Satisfaction Survey”. I haven’t heard anything back from JDPA, but I will update this post if I do.

Be careful how you interpret the results of this survey as it is currently conducted.


From:   [Hidden] 
Sent: Thursday, April 17, 2014 9:09 AM
To:  [Hidden]@jdpa.com';  [Hidden]@jdpa.com
Subject: Builder Satisfaction Survey

Hi:

I took part in one of your builder surveys (the Canadian New-Home Builders Customer Satisfaction Survey) a number of years back; in fact, results of an earlier version of the survey formed a large part of the reason I bought my house in the first place. The idea of the survey is a very good one, but the survey methodology is fatally flawed.  You send out the survey within the first year of occupancy, when the builder is still on the hook to fix deficiencies.  A longitudinal survey would be far more useful.  Similar metrics, but taken at the 6 month mark, the 2 year mark, the 5 year mark and the 7 year mark (just as the Tarion warrantee expires).  This would help you see what owners think about their builder once the hidden problems start to rise to the surface. 

I gave my builder,  [Hidden] , a glowing reference when I responded to your survey, but if I were asked again, my response would be far different and I would be able to provide real examples of poor service and cut-corners.

Without this type of long term look at satisfaction with home builders, the survey is misleading at best. 

Sincerely,

 [Hidden] 
 [Hidden address] 
 [Hidden] ONT

Bell is at it again…

If there is one thing Bell is good at, it is creating an unfair playing field, always tilted in its own corporate favour.  Whether it is about unilaterally changing user agreements after you sign up for them or collecting your usage information without your consent, Bell behaves as if it was immune from the social norms that govern transactions between people.

In this case, Bell seems to be tilting the playing field so that it’s content is available to its customers far more cheaply than that of its competitors, violating the net-neutrality provisions of the internet.

The CBC.CA article on the issue is really interesting and well worth the read.  The CRTC has to do something about this!!!

Foldscope paper microscope can diagnose malaria, costs 50 cents – Technology & Science – CBC News

I am always amazed at how imaginative people can be.  The TED.com blog is full of stories and videos of interesting people with amazing things to say; and so are universities.  You will find a number of entries on my blog site that are based on something amazing that has been developed for the third world by the folks at MIT.  This entry is about an idea originating at Stanford University.  I came across it in an article by CBC.CA (Foldscope paper microscope can diagnose malaria, costs 50 cents – Technology & Science – CBC News)  that explains how Professor Manu Prakash came to create a microscope made almost entirely out of cardboard that can be used to diagnose a multitude of diseases like sleeping sickness, malaria and schistosomiasis in the developing world where access to laboratory equipment is extremely limited.

Imagine if everyone that contracts one of these debilitating illnesses could be quickly diagnosed and treated!  This is the type of story that I love to see because it opens up the mind to all sorts of opportunities.

The original CBC story describes the microscope better than I can, so I won’t go into the details here, but I do also want to post the direct link to Dr. Prakash’s TED talk so that you can see him and his invention. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Making investment practices more sustainable – Another great TED talk

I have thought a lot about the vocabulary we use when we speak about issues.  Much of the language we use comes to us courtesy of Economists.  We speak of consumers or clients rather than citizens.  We speak of economic debt and deficit to the exclusion of the discussion of social, cultural, environmental or infrastructure debt and deficits.  We speak of healthy economies rather than healthy people, or healthy environments.  And we rarely ever focus on important issues like fun or happiness.

This vocabulary poses a number of real problems for us. One very real problem is that if we use economic terms to describe our problems, the solutions we find will be limited to those that offer economic value.  This is the old problem where having only a hammer in your tool belt tends to make every problem look like a nail.  In the long-term, if we are to really deal with important issues in a constructive way, we have to change the way we speak to reflect our real values.  This type of culture change takes time, and, if science is to be believed, we don’t have a lot of time before the chaos starts.

In the meantime, we can at least frame our economic arguments in terms that demonstrate that sustainability is at the heart of long-term economic success, and that is done brilliantly in a TED talk (embedded below) by Chris McKnett from 2013.

TED talk on affects of wealth on personality

">TED talk on effects of wealth on personality

This excellent TED talk describes how wealth can change the way we look at the world.  The first few minutes are devoted to the type of tests that the researchers used to tease out the differences in perception between rich and poor but the real meat was in the last half of the talk where the real world implications of the differences are explored.

It reinforces the need for positive reinforcement of good behaviors (behaviors that decrease inequality) and ends on a note of optimism.  The only problem is, will the people who need to listen to the talk take the time to do so.

 

What the heck is an Earthship? … maybe an idea whose time has come!

earthship brighton
figure 1: Earthship Brighton (Photo credit: ivanpope)

Have you ever heard of the concept of an “Earthship“?  I was introduced to the concept by my brother-in-law about 14 years ago and was blown away.  What is an Earthship then?  In a nutshell, an Earthship is an Eco-friendly home, made predominantly from recycled materials, designed to be as close to “off-grid” as possible.

The concept of Earthships arose in the halcyon flower-power days of the 1970s in various states in the southern USA.  The concept seems to have developed by Michael Reynolds, an architect from New Mexico.  As you can see in the linked Wikipedia article, his idea was not without problems, but it was, none-the-less revolutionary.  Michael has a website where he educates about, demonstrates and promotes the Earthship technology.  The site has designs for a number of systems that an Earthship needs if it is to meet code (see figure 2, below). Continue reading What the heck is an Earthship? … maybe an idea whose time has come!

Are you annoyed enough at Bell Canada to want to switch?

Contracts

If you are annoyed enough by the planned #BellDataGrab to want to switch, you may find it harder than you imagine.  If, for example, you have a contract with Bell for one or more of their services, it may not be easy to get out of the contract.  Don’t lose hope.

CRTC required the telecommunications industry to create an ombudsman for this type of dispute.  This ombudsman is called the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services.

You should be aware that this is an industry funded office, but their mandate is reasonable.  Their mandate is:

"To provide outstanding dispute resolution service to Canadian consumers
and telecom providers, and always to adhere to our core values and 
performance standards."

They cannot help you get out of your contract as long as the service provider provides the services according to the agreement you signed.  The question is, is this new #BellDataGrab a significant change to the agreement you signed.  This is the question that they can help you resolve.  If so, they may be able to help you get out of your current contract.

You can lodge a complaint by visiting their website and completing the complaint form on-line.

Don’t forget that you can also lodge a complaint with the Office of the Canadian Privacy Commissioner.

How to submit a privacy complaint with the Privacy Commissioner

English: Bell Canada logo (1977-1994)
If you feel that your privacy has been, or is being, violated by someone or some organization, you can file a complaint with the Privacy Commissioner for Canada.  If your complaint is with a federal government department or agency, you can file the complaint under the Privacy Act.  If it with the private sector, you have to file the complaint under PIPEDA (the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act).

If, for example, you are concerned that Bell Canada (and now Virgin Mobile) are going to be collecting massive amounts of information about your surfing habits, your television habits, your calling habits or your texting habits, you may wish to make a complaint to the Privacy Commissioner of Canada. Continue reading How to submit a privacy complaint with the Privacy Commissioner

Bell being investigated by Privacy Commissioner

Did you know that Bell Canada (and their daughter company Virgin Mobile Canada) plans to collect massive amounts of information about you and about your surfing habits?  Well they are, and it isn’t clear that they should be able to.  Here is an interesting article by CBC in Montreal that you should definitely read and think about.  Your privacy is yours to protect…you can be pretty certain that Bell won’t protect it as well as you would.

Here is a link to the article.

Get involved, inform yourself, speak out!

Some links to interesting environmental sites

One of my colleagues at work sent me this list of ten interesting environmentally-related web-pages. He recommended them to me and suggested I take a look at them. You may wish to take a look at them too. Thanks Phil!

http://www.marine-conservation.org/

 

Marine Conservation Institute is a leader in the global movement to protect and recover the integrity of vast ocean areas.

We use the latest science to identify important marine ecosystems around the world, and then advocate for their protection, for us and future generations.

http://worldwildlife.org/

centre
centre (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For 50 years, WWF has been protecting the future of nature.

The world’s leading conservation organization, WWF works in 100 countries and is supported by 1.2 million members in the United States and close to 5 million globally. WWF’s unique way of working combines global reach with a foundation in science, involves action at every level from local to global, and ensures the delivery of innovative solutions that meet the needs of both people and nature Continue reading Some links to interesting environmental sites

Conservation International – A blog to make a difference

One of my colleagues showed me this site today and it looks really good.  This is a link to their blog page.  This group has some pretty high priced help on their roster.  From Harrison Ford to Hillary Clinton, they seem to have the bases covered.

One of the environmental movement needs more of is “good news stories” and this blog is replete with them.  One that immediately attracted my attention is on a new initiative to stop poaching of African elephants.  The article includes a video on the subject with the aforementioned celebrities.  Worth a read.  Don’t forget to bookmark the page.

Do Canadian companies represent you well abroad?

rabble.ca has published this very short, interesting article by the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union president, Dave Coles.  In the article he tells of how Canadian companies extractive practices in Columbia trample on the rights of indigenous peoples and give Canada a bad name abroad.  It is entitled “Not in our name…A Canadian energy giant in Colombia” and it is definitely worth the read.

Read it here

 

Stuff

gourken:

Sometimes environmentalism is just about knowing when you already have enough. This is an excellent, concise poem by Storm that captures the idea of needing “stuff” perfectly.

Originally posted on poem storm:

we are living in a daze

caught in our own material haze,

 

we always want,

but do not need,

 

heart and soul,

filled with greed,

-Storm

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Being green can sometimes be as simple as following the frog

The Rainforest Alliance Certified seal
The Rainforest Alliance Certified seal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It may be an advertising pitch, but there is some truth to it.  The Rainforest Alliance has put together a cute pitch that TED.COM has nominated as one of the 10 best ads of the year.  The ad shows you what you don’t want to do to be green, and then goes on to show you one thing that you can do to make a difference.  The advertisement is to “Follow the frog” which refers to purchasing goods that bear the Rainforest Alliance’s frog logo which indicates that the product was made in a way that meets the certification standards set out by the group.

Rainforest Alliance is a non-profit with the mission to “… works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices and consumer behavior.”

Now, you may note that this approach runs counter to the approach promoted by the “Story of change” people but I think the green movement is probably large enough to embrace more than one strategy for saving this beautiful world.

Why not visit their site or just watch the ad here:

Aggressive Driving – Some observations from the peanut gallery

Close Call... Don't Drive Angry / Baynard County
Close Call… Don’t Drive Angry / Baynard County (Photo credit: Phil’s 1stPix)

I often hear pundits decrying the aggressiveness of drivers.  It is hard to disagree with the premise that aggressive driving is bad, but the picture isn’t as simple as the pundits would have you believe.

For one thing, not all aggressive driving is “actively aggressive”.  The pundits rarely discuss the passively aggressive drivers, like the folks that drive in passing lanes.  They also often fail to look for root causes for the driving aggression.

I have been thinking about this issue for a long time and think I have a few suggestions on how to reduce aggressive driving.  My suggestions are in the form of tips and I have organized these suggestions around four possibly overlapping groups of people … 1) the aggressive drivers themselves, 2) traffic planners, 3) other drivers and 4) law makers.  There probably isn’t much new here, and I hope it doesn’t appear to be condescending, but aggressive driving is an issue that has been bugging me for years so I wanted to add my two cents to the conversation. Continue reading Aggressive Driving – Some observations from the peanut gallery

A better way to recycle plastics? Mike Biddle replies to questions and comments about his 2011 TEDTalk

gourken:

Plastic recycle logo Other
Plastic recycle logo Other (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a follow-on article to Mike Biddle’s excellent video on new ways of dealing with plastics recycling. In this article (originally published on the TED.COM website, Mike responds to a number of questions that arose from his original TED talk. He deals with the thorny issue of getting the waste to one of the “mining” facilities.

Here is my a link to my post on the original TED Video

Originally posted on TED Blog:

Last October, we posted this TEDTalk given at TEDGlobal 2011 by plastic engineer Mike Biddle, Founder and President of MBA Polymers, which has developed an incredibly energy and economically efficient method to recycle plastics — by turning it into the raw material  again.

The TEDtalk elicited over 1000 comments and questions on TED.com, Youtube, Facebook, Twitter and elsewhere, including direct emails to Biddle and to the TED staff. Faced with the impossibility to answer them individually, Mike has grouped them together and addressed them below.

And now over to Biddle…

 I want to thank the TED community for all of the heartfelt comments and great questions. Although many of the comments were directed to me as I am the one that gave the TEDtalk, I’m replying here on behalf of the whole MBA Polymers team.  Much like the saying “it takes a village to raise a child”, it…

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The Story of Change : a new video from the makers of the “Story of Stuff”

This video is all about empowerment. It is all about acting on our commitments…to the environment, to social justice, to each other. It is about supporting our government’s initiatives for becoming a “World Class Regulator“.

As with other “stuff” video, this one makes its point in the same clear logical fashion, taking us from being environmentally conscious but isolated islands to empowered actors in a movement to make a better world for us all. It does it using the same cheeky style, replete with stick figure art and snappy dialog.

This “Free Range Studios” production joins the rest of the Story of Stuff projects as another great teaching aid. It reminds us to get together, to get involved and to become activists in our own lives.

Reducing herbicide use – Amazon hires goats for Japanese office landscaping – Your Community

Local goat takes a bite out of weed control problem for Amazon

Here is an unusual article from CBC about how Amazon.com is making use of Japanese goats to get rid of problem weeds on the company’s Japanese office grounds.  Companies don’t always get it right, but when they do, they should get kudos from the rest of us.

Amazon hires goats for Japanese office landscaping – Your Community.

Good on you Amazon.

Oh, and by the way, goats and sheep aren’t allergic to poison ivy, so they are a great way to get rid of that particularly pesky weed.  See this interesting page describing how goats can be very eco-friendly.  I am not certain how eco-friendly goats are in times of drought though…I had heard that the very things that make goats eco-friendly from a herbicide perspective can make them less sustainable in times of drought because they tend to denude the landscape, even eating the roots of the plants.

The real price of market values: Michael Sandel at TEDGlobal 2013

gourken:

My Comments:

This is another great TED talk about a subject of real importance…how market forces change our society and the cost of those changes. The comment about hollowing-out of discourse is most apt. Everything these days seems to be about the sound-bite, about quick fixes for complex social problems. We seem incapable of communicating a long-term vision. Great talk. Thanks TED!

 

Originally posted on TED Blog:

Political philosopher Michael Sandel — the second “Michael from Harvard” this session — returns to TED in the last session of TEDGlobal, “All Together Now,” to address the marketization of our culture.

These days there’s very little money can’t buy. If you ever wind up in jail in San Diego, CA, and you find your cell uncomfortable, don’t fret; simply pay $82 and you’ll be upgraded. Or if you find yourself in Washington, DC, en route to a Congressional hearing, but you hear that the line is around the block, don’t give up; you can pay someone through a line-standing company to wait in line for you. You just have to show up at the last minute and take your seat.

[ted_talkteaser id=878]

In the past three decades, says Sandel, we’ve undergone a quiet revolution, drifting without realizing from a market economy to a market society, where almost everything is…

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Uncovering corruption: Charmian Gooch at TEDGlobal 2013

gourken:

My Comments:

Once again, TED has published a very timely piece on an issue that is becoming huge in the west these days…corruption and its societal costs.  Corruption has always been around, but until recently in the west, it was associated with shame and scandal.  Now it seems to be so commonplace that we barely even acknowledge it.  But the costs of corruption to society are very important and this TEDGlobal talk puts the matter into perspective.  definitely worth a read.  Thanks TED.

 

Originally posted on TED Blog:

When we talk about corruption, certain types of individuals come to mind, says Charmian Gooch, co-founder of watchdog NGO Global Witness. She gives some familiar examples of the type. There’s the (former) Soviet megalomaniac — such as Saparmurat Niyazov, the all-powerful leader of Turkmenistan, whose indulgences included erecting a 40-foot-high gold-plated statue of himself that rotated to follow the sun. There’s the African minister, dictator or official, such as Teodorin Obiang, son of the president of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea, where many live in dire poverty despite per capita income comparable to Portugal. Obiang junior owns an 18 million Euro art collection, million-dollar sports cars, a Gulfstream jet, and a $30 million Malibu mansion. Until recently, he was officially earning less than $7,000 a month. Then there’s the former Nigerian oil minister Dan Etete — a convicted money launderer.

It’s easy to think of corruption as something that happens “over there,”…

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Scientific American Article about the Dangers Associated With CF Light Bulbs

Scientific American Article about the Dangers Associated With CF Light Bulbs

As a follow-on to my earlier article about various technologies for lighting your home, I wanted to post this link.  As the date for conversion of all light bulbs from incandescent looms near there is a lot more is being said about the safety of CF bulbs.  Scientific American, known as a source of reliable information that is accessible to the common citizen, has written an article that describes the dangers associated with disposal of broken fluorescent bulbs. 

Pool leaks are an environmental disaster!

swimming pool
swimming pool (Photo credit: freefotouk)

Regardless of what anyone tells you, if you live in North America your pool should not be losing more than about an eighth of an inch of water (3 mm) each day in the summer.  If it is losing more that that…don’t ignore it and don’t let people tell you that the larger amount of water loss is to be expected.  An inch of pool water is a huge amount and the western world is just beginning to understand that water is our most precious resource.  Don’t waste it like I did!

My family has had an in-ground swimming pool since the kids were little. Generally, we have only had to fill up the pool in the early spring and we are more-or-less good for the rest of the season.  There is a bit of evaporation, but it is usually replaced by rainfall.  This year, unfortunately, was “off the charts” as far as water consumption goes and that is an environmental disaster. Continue reading Pool leaks are an environmental disaster!

Do you remember when Hudson Quebec changed the world of lawn care?

Supreme Court of Canada building, Ottawa, Onta...
Supreme Court of Canada building, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of my colleagues passed me a link to the trailer for a really interesting movie entitled “A Chemical Reaction”. The documentary was produced by Paul Tukey, an award winning writer about lawn care. He is the founder of the safelawns.org, which is an organization that has as its mission to “To create a broad-based coalition of non- and for-profit organizations committed to educating society about the benefits of environmentally responsible lawn care and gardening, and effect a quantum change in consumer and industry behavior.”

The trailer is for a documentary that features our little neighbour, the town of Hudson Quebec (just East of Ottawa), and how a local doctor there, aided by the mayor and council changed the way that lawns are maintained in Canada and likely around the world.

I can remember when it all all went down, but it was a blast to see the folks that made it happen. I remember that there was concern in the medical community (especially in the holistic medical community) about the safety of lawn care products, and that concern was slowly spreading to the general community. You might remember that, back then, everyone (especially municipalities) dumped tons of chemicals on their lawns each year to make them green and “healthy”. Of course the fact that the resulting monoculture was anything but “healthy” and brought with it serious health effects for many creatures (including people) was only beginning to dawn on most of us. And then, in response to a conserted campaign by a local doctor, the Mayor and council of Hudson Quebec decided to take a stand for the health of people over the “health” of lawns. After 10 years of legal battles that ended up in the Supreme Court of Canada, brave little Hudson prevailed and the Court affirmed the right of municipalities to have by-laws that ban the use of chemicals for lawn care.

Anyway, I have only seen the trailer for this documentary, but I found it to be very engaging and compelling. The full film is available on DVD for private or public viewing. The full film is $19.95 to purchase for private viewing and is available for screening at a higher cost. I am considering buying a personal copy so that I can write a better review in the future, but at 3 minutes and 44 seconds, you will not be wasting your time if you decide to look at the trailer.

What’s with the wind every recycling day!

English: Blue household recycling bins/crates ...
Image via Wikipedia

Have you every noticed, that it is almost always windy on the nights when you have to put out your paper or your plastic for recycling?

My house is at the end of a long street that parallels the direction of the prevailing winds and you should see my front yard on recycling mornings. What a mess.  This week, for example, was a plastic recycling week, and after the recycling was picked up by the city I collected two full bins of plastics and cans.

Now, I hate to complain about people who are doing their civic duty by recycling, because I really believe in recycling programs, but seriously! can’t you secure your recycling a bit better than that? When you put your plastics out on a blustery day and the box is overflowing with lightweight plastics, do you really think that they will ever make it into the truck?

At my house, our plastics go into a large rolling blue box with an attached cover so they never blow anywhere. Now this works for plastics because they are so lightweight, but it won’t work for paper because the folks that pick it up would herniate themselves if you packed paper in a large bin. So what can you do about paper products. I suggest that you either pack one of the boxes you are throwing out with paper and put it on top of the filled black box. This way, the paper in the box is protected from the wind and the box itself weighs down the paper in the black box. Another alternative is to put a large rock or a piece of firewood on top of the paper in the black box. The garbage-men will dump these weights back onto your driveway before they dump the contents of the box into the truck, so you can use them over and over again. If you secure your recycling, more of it will actually get to the recycling depot and you will be maximizing your reduction in waste footprint.

But best of all, if you secure your lightweight recyclables, they won’t end up in my front yard. And as Martha Stewart would say, “that is a good thing”.

Exercise – not only does it save energy, but it saves you too!

You may think it a bit of a stretch to link exercise to the environment, but I think it is pretty appropriate.  What got me thinking about it was an article on CBC.ca that pointed to the following YouTube video.  I hope that after watching the video you agree with me.

The video is by Toronto’s Dr. Mike Evans and as CBC’s article pointed out, it has gone viral on YouTube (it has now had over 1.6M hits).  Both the video and the article about it on CBC.ca refer to the health benefits of exercise for all of what ails you (hence the name “magic pill”).  The video is reminiscent of the videos on the “Story of Stuff” channel on YouTube.  While doctor Evans makes his very compelling argument in favour of exercising at least 30 minutes a day (and he notes that more is better to a limit) he draws images on a whiteboard that capture your attention and make you want to listen to the message.  I am not certain if he is any way associated with the Story of Stuff people, but the style of drawing and the humourous and interesting facts he injects into the discussion sure remind me of their excellent environmental pieces.

What interested me most was the fact that even the most moderate exercise (only 11 minutes per day) provided a huge benefit to many of the body’s critical systems.  The first 30 minutes of exercise seems to get you the biggest bang for your sweat buck.  After 30 minutes the benefits accrue in decreasing amounts, but they still accrue. 

Want to find out what sorts of problems you can alleviate with the magic pill of exercise?  Take 6 minutes and watch the video.  You won’t regret the investment in time… I sure didn’t.  You will instantly see why it went viral.  Send a link to the video on to your loved ones. 

Oh, what was the tie in to the environment you ask?  Well, if you are walking, running or cycling everywhere, you aren’t burning fossil fuels, and I think we can all agree that lowering your carbon footprint benefits the environment.

As a final postscript, remember to keep checking back to the “Story of Stuff” channel to see if they have added anything new.  Their environmental stuff is fantastic and it is great for all ages.

And thanks again to CBC.ca for providing me with another excellent learning experience.

Metroland.com – Trash Troubles

Polski: Wysypisko odpadów w Łubnej
Image via Wikipedia

The other day at work, one of my colleagues passed a link on to me because she knew that I am interested in waste management.  I really have to thank her because the link she provided was to an excellent 3 part article entitled “Trash Troubles – grappling with our garbage” (Metroland.com – Trash Troubles) published in MetroLand.com and authored by Don Campbell and Thana Dharmarajah.  These two journalists have done a really good job describing the problems with our solid waste management in many communities in Southern and Eastern Ontario.  It is really worth a read.

In the article, they describe the escalating cost of landfill, the ridiculous practice of shipping our garbage out of our jurisdictions, the patchwork of recycling programs across the province and they provide a few ideas about what citizens can do to minimize their impact on the environment.  They discuss where the responsibility lies for cleaning up our act.

The most important thing that I took away from their article was a feeling that the province needs to step up to the plate and play a bigger role, establishing policies and standards for managing solid waste across all communities, identifying best practices, building markets for recycled materials, and helping to fund waste management programs in a way that provides the best bang for the buck.

Electronic waste accumulates at an alarming rate

Another thing that they bring up that I have been advocating for years is for extended producer responsibility for waste management.  I blogged about this earlier in my open letter to the plastics industry. It is high time that we start holding producers partly responsible for managing the waste that flows from our consumption of their products.  Yes, this will increase the costs of products, but we are paying anyway…this will only bring the payment front and centre and not hiding it in the line items of municipal taxes.  If you want to read more about plastic recycling read my blog entry at https://gourken.wordpress.com/2011/10/08/an-open-letter-to-the-plastics-industry/

Anyway, the article by Campbell and Dharmarajah is an excellent overview of the issues that we need to face if we are to manage our solid wastes responsibly.  While the picture they paint isn’t too hopeful, they do present a few things that will help us see that the future isn’t too bleak either. 

On a final note, I am still very intrigued with Mike Biddle’s idea of using of mining technologies to mine waste streams to allow the extraction and reuse of plastic polymers and metals.  If it works, this is a paradigm shift worthy of the word.  It seems to me that you could use this technology to go back into landfills and mine for valuable resources (like the plastic polymers and the metal ores buried there).  If you want to read more about this technology (and see a video of how it works), visit Mr. Biddle’s web site at http://www.mbapolymers.com/home/.

Solar Lights Recycling | Your Solar Link

I am constantly looking for good environmental blogs and have been following a really good one lately named “Environmental world for all”.  The site is authored by a university student in peace studies with minor in environmental studies. One of the author’s recent posts discusses the benefits of solar LEDs for use as Christmas lights.  It is a really well thougth out article and in it the author discusses the pros and cons around this issue. 

When I left a comment and asked him about the ability to recycle these devices he brought my attention to this site (Solar Lights Recycling | Your Solar Link)  in the US that is trying to set up a recycling program for these products. 

If you are interested in environmental issues I think a few minutes browsing these two sites would be time well spent.

 

Hybrid cars – one buyer’s thoughts

IMA-equipped Honda Civic Hybrid.
Image via Wikipedia

Back in 2009, my family bought a 2010 model year Honda Civic Hybrid. The chart in the dealership, which was produced by an independent tester, gave the Civic a rating of 60 miles per imperial gallon (mpg) in the city and 66 mpg on the highway. A review of the Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) website seems to confirm this rating.

NRCan’s site gives the “mileage” of every car sold in Canada by year. It is supposed to be based on testing that simulates a fuel economy for a car that is driven 20,000 km per year. Presumably the test would simulate real-life conditions including the number of occupants, and a variety of weather and geographical conditions, but it isn’t clear from their web site. The mileage for my car the 2010 Honda Civic Hybrid is given here: http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/compare/compare-results.cfm and it confirms the 60/66 rating given at the dealer.

My question is, what drugs were the testers on when they came up with these figures? We have been using the Civic for almost two years now and we have never come close to those figures. I grant you, that the test figures are likely for the “average” driver, but even so, we have rarely got better than 6.1 l/100km. That works out to about 46.3 mpg. This is a far cry from the 63 mpg (combined city and highway) that we were supposed to get.

When I look at the United States government website I their numbers are closer to my results. they show 40 miles per US gallon (mpgUS) city and 45 mpgUS highway which is about 43mpgUS combined. That equates to about 51 miles per imperial gallon (or only 85% of the NRCan mileage estimates) which is getting better, but it still ends up being about 5 mpg high by my experience.

So what are these testers doing. I assume that they must have only a single driver, and that they must be always on a flat road, with no head-wind and they must be accelerating at a snail’s pace. If I want to approximate these ratings, I would need to get an 100 pound driver driving downhill with a tailwind and the car in neutral.

While I never really expected to get 60 mpg, I did expect better than the 43 mpg that we are getting. Am I expecting too much to ask for mileage approximating the promised rating? I don’t think so. I would likely have bought the car anyway, given that I am interested in the environment, but I don’t like being lied to. If the “independent” tests were to be even remotely useful they should be achievable by the majority of the drivers under normal conditions.

Now, I know I have ignored things like the benefits to the environment, but I have also ignored things like the total cost of ownership (maintenance of the batteries over time) and the cradle to grave costs of the car in terms of cost of building, cost of transportation, use by the consumer and cost of disposal.

But when it comes to strictly the way the cars are advertised, where is the truth of the situation? I sure don’t know? I do know that I feel ripped off! What about you?

Not everything environmental is about new technology…sometimes it is doing what we do in a smarter way.

Sometimes being environmentally friendly means using new technologies like solar and wind power, but sometimes it is simply about doing what we have always done, but doing it in a smarter way. 

URISA, an association of GIS professionals, has an annual competition for students in the GIS field to produce papers and posters on using GIS to solve real world problems.  One group in Maine has used GIS technology to model how to reduce the cost of transportation of recyclables from collection locations to the processing plants.  They will still be using the same technology to collect the recyclables, but they will be reducing the distance that they are transported, resulting in an enormous savings in CO2 generation and a reasonable savings in cost.  This will be especially valuable if we ever move to a “mining” paradigm for dealing with recyclable waste.

To read more about how they propose to do this I recommend that you read Minimizing Transportation Costs with Location-Allocation Analysis: An Application to Recycling « GIS and Science

This is yet another example where students have come up with innovative solutions to problems that we have lived with for ages.  Maybe there is hope for us yet!

Who’s making money on bio-fuels and are they a good alternative to oil?

MIT c1901 LOC cph 3g09599
Image via Wikipedia

I just read an interesting paper from the MIT Centre for Energy and Environmental Policy Research and it had some interesting things to say about bio-fuels and politics.  The paper Some Inconvenient Truths About Climate Change Policy: The Distributional Impacts of Transportation Policies (August 2011), by Stephen P. Holland, Jonathan E. Hughes Christopher R. Knittel and Nathan C. Parker is a technical paper where they reflect on the relationship that exists between various forms of carbon emission reductions that rely on subsidised biofuels and voting patterns in the United States. 

The paper compares the costs to reduce greenhouse gasses of three different policy choices against the Cap and Trade (CAT) option, which does not subsidize the production of biofuels.  They show CAT as the lowest cost alternative in terms of dollars per unit of carbon reduction but find that the higher cost options are frequently adopted.  They go on to show that the subsidized options, though more expensive, produce the highest potential for private gain, while CAT produces the highest potential for carbon emission reduction per dollar spent. 

While the article does not answer the question posed in the title, it does seem to conclude that if private interests were taken out of the equation, we could get better carbon reduction bang for our bucks if we adopted a cap and trade system rather than any of the subsidized bio-fuel alternatives.

The article is a bit technical, but it is still written in such a way that most informed readers can take something away from it.  It is also nice to see that these issues are being discussed by institutions such as MIT.

An open letter to the plastics industry

Self made from PNG.
Image via Wikipedia

First, I am not rabidly anti-plastic. I think that plastic has made many parts of our life better, but I am against plastic waste (plastic for which there is no after market recycling program) and I am against over packaging, and your industry is implicated in both.

From an energy perspective, I am aware that lightweight plastic packaging is cheaper to transport than many other materials. From an energy perspective, the problem is that plastics consume oil products that could be used to heat homes, to fuel automobiles, etc. If you cannot reuse a plastic product that is recycled, it means that you will be consuming new oil for every product you produce.

From a waste perspective, you need look no further than the Eastern Pacific to see a Texas sized “island” of plastic waste that will last for tens of thousands of years. If your industry does not come to grips with this problem, we will be doing it for you by banning the use of plastic products. This is not in your best interests and it isn’t good for consumers either. Get your act together and:

1. Make certain that every type of plastic is well-marked for recycling and don’t allow unmarked plastics into the market place.

2. Help local governments fund plastic recycling programs

3. Help create markets for recycled plastic and ways to use them that is environmentally friendly and energy-efficient

4. Don’t produce anything that you cannot re-use in manufacturing and set targets and deadlines for recycling 80% of the product you produce.

5. Ensure that products that contain recycled plastic are marked, advertising that they have helped keep plastic out of landfills.

6. Talk to the packaging industry and retail stores to get them to reduce “over packaging” and to ensure that all packaging can be easily separated into non-plastic and plastic products and that the individual plastic components are all marked for recycling

7. Fund “bring it back collection sites” for large plastic components that it is not possible for the recycling programs to handle.

Many of the same recommendations should be addressed to municipal and provincial governments to ensure that if industry doesn’t step up to the plate that the regulators do, so if you don’t want to get regulated out of business, I suggest you consider cleaning up your act.

Gourken

 

Solar light bulbs for pennies (Isang Litrong Liwanag/a litre of light)

A litre of light

I just ran across a wonderful innovationthat seems to have been around for a few years but just now seems to be garnering widespread attention. The innovation seems to be the brainchild either the Massachusetts Institute of Technology or of Mr. Illac Diaz of the Philippines. It is as brilliant in its simplicity as it is as a light bulb. I am going to leave the description of the “bulbs” and how they are used to the foundation (and to two interesting YouTube videos (describing the why and how). One of the linked videos below describes this as an idea out of MIT and that makes sense because that institution seems to focus on a lot of simple projects to help the poor (see my earlier blog about solar powered water desalinators that were developed by MIT folks).

Continue reading Solar light bulbs for pennies (Isang Litrong Liwanag/a litre of light)

Solar Thermal – What to do when the power goes out!

I spent 6 months living in Kathmandu back in the 90s.  It was commonplace for the power to go off each evening for 2 or more hours and to cope with the outages everyone had battery backups and gas-powered generators. 

But over here in Canada we have never needed battery backups or generators to keep things running.  The electrical system is far more reliable here than it was in Nepal in the 90s.  That being said, we do still get the occasional power outages but for the most part they are little more than an inconvenience.  The same cannot be said for solar thermal systems when the power goes out.  Continue reading Solar Thermal – What to do when the power goes out!

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